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Posts Tagged ‘BI’

A thought-provoking post – The Future of Data Warehousing: 7 Industry Experts Share Their Predictions

January 7, 2015 Leave a comment

The Future of Data Warehousing: 7 Industry Experts Share Their Predictions discusses the modern data warehouse architecture and emerging trends.

Categories: BI Tags:

SSRS and R

November 19, 2014 Leave a comment

Jen Underwood just published her latest blog (R Visualizations in Reporting Services) and it is very exciting topic. This solution looks like a native SSRS solution and I would love to give it a try.

Back to year 2010, I read a article (Analyzing Direct Marketing Data with R) by Liang Wei and Brendan Kitts from Lucid Commerce Inc. discussing how to render a R chart within SSRS. 

Categories: BI, R, SSRS Tags: , ,

FW: The Graphic Continuum

November 18, 2014 Leave a comment
Categories: BI Tags:

Embedded SQL Reporting Services Reports into Tableau Dashboard

November 13, 2014 Leave a comment

I blogged about Add Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services charting capability to Tableau a few days ago. And I also blogged how to use SSRS data driven subscription to mass generate hundreds of images to be used as Tableau custom shape. However, Tableau does not support high resolution images in custom shape. Hence, I’ll show you another approach and probably an extremely powerful way: Directly Calling and Displaying a SQL Server Reporting Service Reports inside Tableau Dashboard

Look at the below two screenshot:

1 – Embeded SSRS Reports in Tableau Dashboard – with command toolbarEmbeded SSRS Reports in Tableau Dashboard - with command toolbar

2 – Embeded SSRS Reports in Tableau Dashboard – no command toolbarEmbeded SSRS Reports in Tableau Dashboard - no command toolbar

For experienced SSRS developer, I’m sure you already guess the trick: use SSRS URL access inside a Tableau Web Page control. Basically, in the first one, the URL is:

http://<SSRS Server>/ReportServer?%2fGaugeSamples%2fThermometerChart&rs:Command=Render&Value=102

and the second one is:

http://<SSRS Server>/ReportServer?%2fGaugeSamples%2fThermometerChart&rs:Command=None&Value=102

The first parameter (rs:Command) tells SSRS server whether to render the command toolbar and the other parameter (Value) tells what the Thermometer Indicator’s value should be.

Personally, I’m very excited about this integration. It opens a door of endless possibility. For example, you can:

  • Leverage existing Microsoft BI assess and integrate into Tableau dashboard
  • SSRS is able to handle pixel perfect chart rendering and can be used as a dynamic charting library inside Tableau dashboard. As you can see in the first screenshot, there is a property called “Size of the bulb at the bottom of the thermometer”. You can expose lots of properties through parameters and let Tableau to invoke them on the fly. Imagine you have drop downs in the Tableau dashboard to passing parameters to SSRS reports to precisely control the chart rendering. This is probably what Tableau is lacking of at the moment.
  • Powerful operational reports. SSRS far better superior operational reports capability than Tableau. Now you can use Tableau to give the user a high level glance and dive into super detailed details.
  • SSRS has auto refresh feature that you can let the chart to refresh every X seconds. Great for operational BI. (I have tested whether the auto refresh is working inside Tableau web page control myself. I’ll test it out later.)
  • SSRS has actions (Similar to Tableau dashboard action) that can chain various SSRS reports together to provide “guided navigation” as well as “execute some operational tasks” together with each SSRS report execution. Imagine the scenario that you deep dive into the details and then click the report action inside the SSRS report which invoke a SQL Server Integration Services Package (SSIS, Microsoft’s ETL platform) on the fly and execute a Python script to generate another Tableau Data Extract. I don’t want to dive into details. But when you bring the entire Microsoft BI stack together, you are talking about something beyond the imagination.

The Power View should work as well using this URL integration approach but at this stage, Tableau offers much better interactivity. As the Power BI platform gets more mature, maybe it is another great story. Stay tuned…

Categories: BI, Power BI, SSRS, Tableau Tags: , , ,

Use Power Query to Generate Date Table with Australian Financial Year and Holiday Flag

November 13, 2014 Leave a comment

This is not a new technic as Chris Webb and Matt Mason have both blogged about formulas for generating  a date table using Power Query. Darren Gosbell has another blog for ISO weeks and 4-4-5 period. They are all excellent articles that you can reference as use straight away.

In my recent project, I need to filter out the data with Australian Financial Year (FY) and holidays. So I wrote my own version of the Power Query to get it done. I’ll share the Excel 2013 workbook below for you to download.


I’ll briefly talk about how I do it. You can view the actual Power Query code in my shared Excel 2013 workbook.

Step 1 – Take Matt Masson’s Power Query as the start point and add FY calculation.

Step 2 – Find Australian Holiday information. I could find any useful one by just use Power Query online search. Jump to Google search and find http://australia.gov.au/topics/australian-facts-and-figures/public-holidays. I then use the Power Query to load it and perform all sorts of data manipulation to make it ready for merging with my base query. Having said that, for demo purpose, it is good. In reality, I would prefer to load it once and save it as a static table somewhere for reference. As you can imagine, the Power Query will break if the web page changes and for such small volume, automation does not add much value to manual maintenance.

Step 3 – Merging the Power Query produced from Step 1 and 2 and do the final cleansing.

Enjoy!

Categories: BI, Excel, Power Query Tags: , ,

Another one, Thermometer Chart in Tableau

November 11, 2014 Leave a comment

Following up Gauge Chart in Tableau and Add Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services charting capability to Tableau, here is another one: Thermometer Chart (value from -22 to 104(F) )

10028

The Tableau workbook can be found at: https://public.tableausoftware.com/views/TableauThermometerChart/Thermometer

The image I generated can be downloaded :

Categories: BI, SSRS, Tableau Tags: , ,

Gauge Chart in Tableau

November 10, 2014 3 comments

Continue my previous post Add Microsoft SQL Server Reporting Services charting capability to Tableau, I’ll walk through how do I add gauge charts to Tableau.

1. go to: https://msftrsprodsamples.codeplex.com/wikipage?title=SS2008!AdventureWorksOffline%20Report%20Samples to download the sample reports to get a demo ready Gauge chart in SSRS. It use XML data source so that you can even run the report offline without connect to any data source.

2. change the gauge chart RDL to create a parameter and set the gauge indicator value to  derive from this parameter

3. change the chart size and report page size. In my test, I set all of them to 5cm. I also set margin to 0cm so that there is no gap around the gauge.

4. deploy to the SSRS report server.

5. navigate to the report management page and create a data driven subscription. Basically, the data driven subscription query returns a table with 100 rows to get value from 1 to 100. The data driven subscription loop through this query and generate the gauge chart one by one and push to a shared folder location.

6. copy the generated 100 TIFF images to Tableau’s custom shape folder C:\Users\George.Qiao\Documents\My Tableau Repository\Shapes\MyGaugeChart\

7. Create Tableau worksheet and enjoy! Below is the one I created:

Gauge Chart in Tableau

To play with it, you can go to https://public.tableausoftware.com/views/TableauGaugeChart/Dashboard-Gauge

For those one who want the gauge chart images, here is the link:

Categories: BI, SSRS, Tableau Tags: , ,