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Posts Tagged ‘Power Query’

Use Power Query to connect to Salesforce custom domain

February 14, 2015 2 comments

Power Query Salesforce connector is great but it does not support Salesforce custom domain at the moment.

Well, that is the limitation of using the PQ UI. You can actually make it work if you use M directly.

With the help of Curt Hagenlocher from Microsoft, I figured out how. What he said:

You should be able to use a custom domain in Power Query itself by manually editing the formula to include the login domain name. That is, instead of
=Salesforce.Data()
You’d have
=Salesforce.Data(“https://my.custom.salesforce.com“)

 

 

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Categories: BI, Power Query Tags: ,

Follow Up of Chris Webb’s post of “Specifying Allowed Values, Sample Values and Descriptions For Function Parameters In Power Query” – Using Dynamic Value

November 28, 2014 Leave a comment

Another great blog post of “Specifying Allowed Values, Sample Values and Descriptions For Function Parameters In Power Query” from Chris Webb.

In his post, he showed a way to use a dropdown instead of a plain text box to prompt the user to select the value for the parameter of a Power Query function.

In his code between line 13 and 17:

MySecondNumberParamType = type number
                        meta
                        [Documentation.Description = "Please choose a number",
                         Documentation.AllowedValues = {1..5}],    

The allowed value 1,2,3,4,5 is hard-coded. I wonder can I use a Power Query function to dynamically populate the AllowedValues instead? So I did the following test:

  1. Create a single column table in Excel, looks like the blow.
    ID
    =============
    1
    2
    3


    10000
  2. Add this table to Power Query (Power Query ribbon –> From Table) and name this Power Query as “Table_Param”
  3. Change the column type to Text. This is important, see blow:
    #"Changed Type" = Table.TransformColumnTypes(Source,{{"ID ", type text}})
    
  4. Go to Chris’s Power Query “MultipleTwoNumbersV2” and open the advanced editor
  5. Change the code from
    Documentation.AllowedValues = {1..5}], 
    

    to

    Documentation.AllowedValues = Table.ToList(Table_Param)],
    
  6. Now try to invoke this Power Query function and you will find the dropdown box having the value return form the function.

This dynamic value approach should enable you to get the data from various sources e.g. database, Excel, web etc

However, there is two limitations:

  • The data type in Table_Param must be Text. And this is highlighted in the above step 3. Therefore, you need to either perform an inline type cast or a change data type step in the Power Query.
  • Although the Table.Tolist() support large volume of data, the number of the allowedvalue populated in the dropdown box will only be first 1000 items. Well, in most cases, that’s more than enough.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Excel, Power Query Tags: ,

Thoughts after attending the Azure Machine Learning Meetup

November 26, 2014 Leave a comment

This is a long overdue post about the feedback after I attended the Azure ML meetup  hosted by Microsoft and Big Data Analytics user group. Overall, it was a great and informative session. Big thanks to Shashank Pawar and Rami Mukhtar.

The session stated with high level overview about what Azure ML’s capability. A few demos were given to showcase how easily you can leverage the ML to turn the predictive analytics into REST API that can be invoked easily. One of the fascinating demo Shashank showed is that you can call the ML web services on the fly from an Excel formula (CodePlex project – Azure Machine Learning Excel Add-In) while filling a table in Excel. Chris Webb has also blogged about using Power Query to do sentiment analysis for Facebook posts via Lexicon based API from ML.

One of the very interesting thing during the session is that no one, not even single one, asked about what algorithms Microsoft has been added into ML. The questions are pretty much focused on How R is integrated into the ML. People had asked about the performance, parallelism, available R packages, ability to upload custom R packages etc. It looks like most people who are interested in ML are actually considering using ML as the wrapper to operationalize R execution. And I’m not sure whether Microsoft thinks the same way. Will Microsoft treat the R execution as the first class citizen in the ML stack? ML offers a graphical interface to provide basic data exploring such as data profiling etc. I doubt how many people will actually use those features. I would imagine data scientist would just use their own “tool of the choice” and only use ML to operationalize the model. Personally, I would love to see the ML evolves to a predictive analytics automation engine with rich APIs for automation rather than a standalone predictive analysis packages.

A side note, one of the data source supported by ML is Power Query! This is a great idea and I’m really looking forward to seeing more demo of using PQ together with ML.

Use Power Query to Generate Date Table with Australian Financial Year and Holiday Flag

November 13, 2014 Leave a comment

This is not a new technic as Chris Webb and Matt Mason have both blogged about formulas for generating  a date table using Power Query. Darren Gosbell has another blog for ISO weeks and 4-4-5 period. They are all excellent articles that you can reference as use straight away.

In my recent project, I need to filter out the data with Australian Financial Year (FY) and holidays. So I wrote my own version of the Power Query to get it done. I’ll share the Excel 2013 workbook below for you to download.


I’ll briefly talk about how I do it. You can view the actual Power Query code in my shared Excel 2013 workbook.

Step 1 – Take Matt Masson’s Power Query as the start point and add FY calculation.

Step 2 – Find Australian Holiday information. I could find any useful one by just use Power Query online search. Jump to Google search and find http://australia.gov.au/topics/australian-facts-and-figures/public-holidays. I then use the Power Query to load it and perform all sorts of data manipulation to make it ready for merging with my base query. Having said that, for demo purpose, it is good. In reality, I would prefer to load it once and save it as a static table somewhere for reference. As you can imagine, the Power Query will break if the web page changes and for such small volume, automation does not add much value to manual maintenance.

Step 3 – Merging the Power Query produced from Step 1 and 2 and do the final cleansing.

Enjoy!

Categories: BI, Excel, Power Query Tags: , ,

News On SSAS Data Source Support In Power BI

November 7, 2014 Leave a comment

Chris Webb's BI Blog

Yesterday we heard (again) that SSAS will be supported as a data source for cloud-based reports in Power BI. Today, in a session, two new important details on this emerged:

  • It will work with both Tabular and Multidimensional
  • It will connect as the user running the query, so SSAS security (eg dimension security) will work just the same as it does on-premises. No special setup will be needed; there were no details apart from the fact it will work using the EffectiveUserName connection string property.

I’m sure a lot of people will be interested to hear this…

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Power Query with SSIS OData Feed Publishing Components

November 6, 2014 Leave a comment

Power Query won’t be able to connect to Oracle / IBM DB2 database unless the driver is installed locally. In many cases, we cannot freely install the driver due to enterprise security policy and lots of other reasons. And to mass distribute the diver to client PCs is another big issue. SSIS Data Feed component removes this gap via exposing complex ETL as a single SQL Server database view which can be queried by Power Query directly. With SSISDB introduced in SSIS 2012, powerful auditing and performance logging can be enabled with the help of out of box reporting features as well as lots of nice CodePlex community projects.

In a recent project, I use this technic to enable a scenario that an end user is able to query a SQL Server database view which actually invoke an ETL job in real time and streaming data back to Excel. If you do have the Power BI subscription, you can even share the Power Query through Power Query Data Catalog and become searchable by colleagues. To take further, I build an ASP.NET as a query register and capture some metadata of the query. Then I use Varigence Mist (BIML IDE, a super powerful tool!) to dynamically generate the SSIS packages on the fly and deploy to server via Power Shell and create a view on top of it. It is truly awesome and I’m proud of what I achieved.

The only drawback is that the Project Deployment does not support incremental deployment at the moment. I wish in next SSIS release, the incremental deployment can be implemented so that we can add additional SSIS Data Feeds without redeploy the entire project.

FWD:“I Modified an Existing Table in Power Query and Now it Won’t Refresh”– A Fix